Tag: fungi

St George’s Mushroom

From ‘British Edible Fungi: How to Distinguish and Cook them.’ By M. C. Cooke, M.A., L.L.D., A.L.S. London, 1891. St George’s mushroom: Agaricus gambosus 1821, Tricholoma gambosum c1891, Calocybe gambosa… Read More

Homemade Bouillon Powders

Making your own bouillon could not be simpler. This process applies to any ingredient but I’ve started with wild mushrooms (in this case birch bolete) as they give an unrivalled… Read More

Scarlet Elf Caps

Scarlet Elf Caps Sarcoscypha coccinea are an edible fungus in the order Pezizale, that Orange Peel Fungus belongs to. They are widespread in February and love fallen branches half-buried in… Read More

Hairy Curtain Crust bracket fungus

Hairy Curtain Bracket (Stereum hirsutum) is a great name for this wood loving fungi that thrives on dead wood and can often be found right through the winter months. It… Read More

Winter Chanterelle mushrooms

The last week of October. It’s dark by 6, there’s a chill in the air, and the trees are wearing their full autumn colours. The wild mushroom season is drawing… Read More

Porcini Mushroom and Walnut Soup

This is an absolutely delicious soup. Ceps Boletus edulis and walnuts make perfect partners. It is also very quick and easy to make. Ingredients 1 onion 500 grams fresh porcini… Read More

Giant porcini mushroom

One of my guests on Sunday’s Fabulous Fungi Walk spotted this huge penny bun. Also known as ceps or porcini Boletus edulis this monster mushroom weighed about 850 grams. Still… Read More

Shaggy Inkcap Mushrooms

Shaggy Inkcaps Coprinus comatus– also known as Lawyer’s Wig – are edible but there are a few things to note. You need to eat them soon after picking as they… Read More

Laughing Gym aka Gymnopilus junionius

I originally thought that this was a Pholiota and the old specifies names for Gymnopilus junionius was indeed Pholiota spectabilis and it’s certainly pretty spectacular. Some subspecies contain psilocybin are… Read More

Field mushrooms by the pailful

When our local farmer told me there were field mushrooms “by the pail’fer in the files next to the sheep” he wasn’t joking! This was a lucky meeting a the… Read More

Birch Polypore

Young Birch Polypore (Piptoporus betulinus) has been used medicinally for over 5000 years as antiparasitic, antimicrobial, to treat wounds, stomach diseases and in rectal cancer. Tests prove has anticancer effect… Read More

Oyster Mushrooms

Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) is common on fallen or dying hardwood trees and is delicious (above). Branched Oyster Mushrooms (Pleurotus cornucopioides) smelled wonderful but didn’t pick them this time (below).

Porcelain Fungus

Porcelain Fungus (Oudemansiella mucida) Edible. Wash off mucus & remove stems. Nice taste although not as tasty as oyster mushrooms. Eat them fresh as they deteriorate quite quickly.

Turkey Tail mushrooms – Trametes versicolor

Turkey tail mushrooms are found growing on logs, especially fallen beech, throughout the world and certainly here in Scotland. Their rather obvious name is due to them looking literally like… Read More

Stump puffballs – Lycoperdon pyriforme

Stump puffballs are edible and best when gathered young as they have a firm texture, exquisite smell but mild taste, and not as good as field puffballs. But they are… Read More

Chanterelles – Cantharellus citharius

Exquisite flavour, slightly fruity and slightly peppery, this is one of the most popular of the edible mushrooms. Most foragers have a secret patch that they visit and the secret… Read More

Mushroom breakfast

Gently fried in butter with some chopped chives, salt and pepper and garnished with chive flowers. This is mixture of chanterelles and hedgehog fungi. Before… and After!

Hedgehog fungus – Hydnum repandum

Luckily for foragers, hedgehog fungus is far less well-known that it’s cousin the chanterelle. It is easily identified by its spines or teeth under the cap which look vary different… Read More

Oyster Mushrooms on the Menu

Both of the large horse chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum trees that fell in the January gale were host to some fabulous oyster mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus. Fried in butter with an egg… Read More

The Mushrooms are Back!

Watching the tractors out mowing and baling in the fields fills me with dread, knowing that summer is drawing to a close and winter is on its way. So the… Read More